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Puerto Rican Pittsburghers fear impact Hurricane Fiona expected to leave on their home

Hurricane Fiona made landfall in Puerto Rico Sunday afternoon, nearly five years after Hurricane Maria killed thousands and left the island devastated.Pittsburgh’s ties with Puerto Rico are strong, dating back decades with the Clemente family.Antoinette Tirado was born and raised in Puerto Rico but moved to Pittsburgh a few years ago. Right now, her family in Puerto Rico is dealing with a blackout and having to ration their food in the event food becomes scarce.“The floods are crazy, they’re destroying the houses,” Antoinette Tirado said.Tirado said she and her son Daniel feel PTSD from the devastation left 5 years ago by Hurricane Irma and Maria. Both impacted the island within days of each other. “It just hurts to hear that another one’s coming when they’re still trying to rebuild and recover from the last two that happened in the span of two weeks,” Daniel Valdez said.“You feel like you can’t do anything from the distance,” Tirado said.However, 5 years ago, she was able to help even at a distance. In response to the devastation of Hurricane Maria, her family and local Pittsburghers launched “Pittsburgh Stands with Puerto Rico.” They collected donations by the truckloads and got them delivered to the island. Tirado was able to go to Puerto Rico in the days following Maria to help distribute the donations.“Even though the hurricane is not as strong as Maria, the infrastructure is already weak,” Tirado said.The power grid is already knocked out. Hurricane Fiona is reportedly forecasted to dump historic levels of rainfall.Terado is waiting to see what the full impact of hurricane Fiona will be before launching donation efforts or directing people on ways to give, but she asks this of her fellow Pittsburghers…“Save some cash. Probably people will need medications. Right now, because it’s happening right now, we don’t know what the need is right now. We don’t know how prepared they were this time, but from what I’m seeing the help is going to be needed,” Tirado said.We will keep you updated on local efforts to support the people of Puerto Rico in the coming weeks.

Hurricane Fiona made landfall in Puerto Rico Sunday afternoon, nearly five years after Hurricane Maria killed thousands and left the island devastated.

Pittsburgh’s ties with Puerto Rico are strong, dating back decades with the Clemente family.

Antoinette Tirado was born and raised in Puerto Rico but moved to Pittsburgh a few years ago. Right now, her family in Puerto Rico is dealing with a blackout and having to ration their food in the event food becomes scarce.

“The floods are crazy, they’re destroying the houses,” Antoinette Tirado said.

Tirado said she and her son Daniel feel PTSD from the devastation left 5 years ago by Hurricane Irma and Maria. Both impacted the island within days of each other.

“It just hurts to hear that another one’s coming when they’re still trying to rebuild and recover from the last two that happened in the span of two weeks,” Daniel Valdez said.

“You feel like you can’t do anything from the distance,” Tirado said.

However, 5 years ago, she was able to help even at a distance. In response to the devastation of Hurricane Maria, her family and local Pittsburghers launched “Pittsburgh Stands with Puerto Rico.” They collected donations by the truckloads and got them delivered to the island.

Tirado was able to go to Puerto Rico in the days following Maria to help distribute the donations.

“Even though the hurricane is not as strong as Maria, the infrastructure is already weak,” Tirado said.

The power grid is already knocked out. Hurricane Fiona is reportedly forecasted to dump historic levels of rainfall.

Terado is waiting to see what the full impact of hurricane Fiona will be before launching donation efforts or directing people on ways to give, but she asks this of her fellow Pittsburghers…

“Save some cash. Probably people will need medications. Right now, because it’s happening right now, we don’t know what the need is right now. We don’t know how prepared they were this time, but from what I’m seeing the help is going to be needed,” Tirado said.

We will keep you updated on local efforts to support the people of Puerto Rico in the coming weeks.



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