Monday, October 3, 2022
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Suspicious package closes Canadian side of Ambassador Bridge for hours

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The Canadian side of the Ambassador Bridge is open again for international travel after a suspicious package Sunday shut it down for several hours.

Windsor police announced a closure due to a “suspicious package found in a vehicle,” just before 9 p.m Sunday. The bridge that connects Detroit to Canada was closed for an “indeterminate period of time” as they investigated the situation.

According to a tweet from the Police Department on Sunday evening, the package was found in a vehicle on the bridge.

The bridge, which spans from the city of Detroit over the Detroit River to the city of Windsor on the Canadian side, remained closed for almost two hours.

Drivers were able to use the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel to make the border crossing. As of Monday morning, the bridge is also open for travel.



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5 things to know this Monday, October 3

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ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — It’s finally spooky season! Happy first Monday of October, Capital Region. Don’t let the bitter cold get you down, to start this week—Meteorologist Rob Lindenmuth said it won’t last!

Today’s five things to know include a deadly shooting on Central Avenue, a structure fire in Watervliet, and a man arrested after allegedly killing someone on Hamilton Street.

1. Albany Police probe deadly Central Avenue shooting

A 24-year-old man was shot and killed on Central Avenue Sunday evening, according to the Albany Police Department. A spokesman for the department said the man was shot at about 7:30 p.m., near the intersection of Central Avenue and Robin Street.

2. Watervliet Fire Department responds to structure fire

The Watervliet Fire Department (WFD) and Watervliet Police Department (WPD) responded to a house fire on 6th avenue Sunday afternoon around 1:15 p.m.

3. Albany PD: Arrest made in Hamilton Street shooting

Brian Moses, 20 has been charged in connection with a homicide that happened on Friday, September 30 on Hamilton street in Albany. Police carried out an investigation after a male, 18 was found in the roadway with gunshot wounds.

4. Pittsfield police arrest woman for murder

Pittsfield police arrested Desmond Phillip, 42 on Friday, September 30. Phillip was arrested for the murder of Teddy Cepeda, 43.

5. Groundbreaking for new Saratoga Springs park Monday

Groundbreaking for the new Flat Rock Park in Saratoga Springs will take place on Monday, October 3. The park will offer a new outdoor gathering place to residents of the area.



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Kevin Love’s mental health fund part of multi-district summit this month | You are Not Alone with Hollie Strano

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This year, the summit is bigger than ever, thanks to one Clevelander passionate about mental health: Kevin Love.

PARMA, Ohio — Last year, WKYC told you about the yearly mental health summit at Parma Schools, where they train their staff and students to be mental health ambassadors. This year, the summit is bigger than ever, thanks to one Clevelander passionate about mental health: Kevin Love.

“We’re gonna train a thousand students across the area, to be mental health ambassadors at their schools,” explained Marian Armstrong, a counselor at Parma Senior High.

For the past five years, the district’s “Hope Squad” ambassador program and the yearly summit have made mental health education as important as any other subject in the district. The Hope Squad is a national program for suicide prevention. It uses the students to spot lonely or struggling students in-person or through their social media. The students are trained to reach out to those other kids.

The summit trains the district’s students and staff to spot similar things, and know how to respond in a crisis. It’s been so successful, many other districts called, wanting to take part this year.

“Another school system called, and another school system called,” remembers Armstrong.

This year, students and staff at more than 15 area districts will take part in the summit on October 10 at Rocket Mortgage Fieldhouse, where one other mental health ambassador has made quite a name for himself. The Kevin Love Fund is partnering with Parma Schools, even donating $5,000, and will use its newly-created curriculum to train students and staff. He will also make it possible for all the students to attend a pre-season Cavs game later that day.

“So during the summit while the kids are doing their workshops, our advisors are going to be doing a Kevin Love Fund workshop where they’re going to be trained by their team to learn the whole SEL curriculum that he’s been working on with their team for over a year,” Armstrong said.

The newly-launched curriculum is free to schools, and consists of 15-plus lesson plans that teach students and staff 6 values:

  • Destigmatize emotions often labeled as “negative” by our culture
  • Recognize that thoughts and feelings are connected and distinguish between kind thoughts and critical ones
  • Cultivate empathy for others
  • Understand the connection between gratitude and well-being
  • Recognize that kindness and service are linked to happiness
  • Craft a hopeful vision for the future

“So were not training them to be therapists, that’s very important. We’re training them to be the bridge to someone who can help somebody in crisis,” Armstrong said.

The summit’s impact, hoping to not only reach more students than ever, but make a lasting impression, thanks to an NBA star reminding us that you are not alone, matter who you are.

“This is, it’s really just having these kids look into themselves a little more, then they wouldn’t do so at school,” says Halle Holub, a counselor at Brecksville-Broadview Heights schools.

“Kids are sad, and they’re anxious, and they’re just not as resilient as they used to be. Hopefully with a program like this we can teach resiliency, and spread that across the city again,” said Armstrong.

Besides the Kevin Love Fund donation, another one from Quest Diagnostics is what will make this event possible. Parma schools have also partnered with the other following organizations that will be on hand that day:

  • Reilley’s Angels: therapy/service dogs
  • Cleveland Clinic
  • Education Service Center of NEO
  • ADAMHS Board of Cuyahoga County
  • Life Act, 
  • Recovery Resources 
  • NAMI of Cuyahoga County 
  • The Harris Project
  • The Journey Center for Safety and Healing 
  • Youth Yoga Project
  • CSU Counseling department
  • SADD
  • LGBTQ+ Center

If you would like to learn more about the Kevin Love Fund’s curriculum, click here.

Editor’s Note: The following video is from a previous, unrelated story:



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1 dead in McKeesport house fire

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A fire in McKeesport left one man dead Sunday morning. Firefighters were called to Soles Street around 10:30 a.m. On scene, they found smoke and flames pouring from the roof of a home there. The fire grew to two alarms before crews were able to bring it under control. Neighbors told Pittsburgh’s Action News 4 the victim was a man in his 90s who lived in the home. Officials have not released the man’s name. There is no word on what caused the fire.

A fire in McKeesport left one man dead Sunday morning.

Firefighters were called to Soles Street around 10:30 a.m. On scene, they found smoke and flames pouring from the roof of a home there.

The fire grew to two alarms before crews were able to bring it under control.

Neighbors told Pittsburgh’s Action News 4 the victim was a man in his 90s who lived in the home.

Officials have not released the man’s name.

There is no word on what caused the fire.



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Google discontinues Google Translate in mainland China

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HONG KONG (AP) — Google has discontinued its Google Translate services in mainland China, removing one of the company’s few remaining services that it had provided in a country where most Western social media platforms are blocked.

The Google Translate app and website now display a generic search bar and a link redirecting Chinese users to its page in Hong Kong, which is blocked on the mainland.

Users reported not being able to access the service since Saturday, according to Chinese social media posts. The translation feature built into the Google Chrome browser also no longer functions for users in China.

The Google Translate service was discontinued in China due to “low usage,” Google said in a statement. It is not clear how many users were using Google Translate in China.

The U.S. technology firm’s has a fraught relationship with China. In 2010, Google pulled its search engine from the Chinese market after it became unwilling to abide by the country’s censorship rules.

China later moved to block other Google services such as its email service Gmail and Google Maps.

Chinese authorities typically block most Western social media platforms and services, including those of Google, Facebook and Twitter as the government seeks to maintain strict censorship rules. Chinese platforms must abide strictly by those rules and censor keywords and topics the authorities deem politically sensitive.

In 2017, Google made its translation service available on the mainland via a Chinese domain as it explored ways to offer services in the Chinese market. Its Google Translate service competed with other popular, homegrown translation alternatives provided by Chinese technology firms including Baidu and Sogou.

Google had explored launching a separate, censored search engine for China, but terminated the project in 2019 amid a global backlash.

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Richmond Public Schools plans to reject Youngkin’s transgender policies at school board meeting

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RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) — Richmond Public Schools will hold a school board meeting at 5 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 3, to provide a resolution to Gov. Glenn Youngkin’s transgender policies for public schools.

Youngkin’s new guidelines state:

• Students must only use bathrooms and locker rooms associated with the sex assigned to them
at birth
• If a student wants to participate in a sport or other extracurricular activities, they must, again,
only participate in teams that align with the sex assigned at birth
• The legal name and sex of a student can’t be changed “even upon written instruction of a parent
or eligible student” without an official legal document or court order
• And teachers and other school officials can only refer to a student by their pronouns associated
with their sex at birth

A law passed in 2020 under democratic leadership directed the Virginia Department of Education to create “model policies” to “address common issues regarding transgender students in accordance with evidence-based best practices.” 

To read more about Youngkin’s policies, click BELOW:



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Poor Florida neighborhood battered by Ian tries to recover

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HARLEM HEIGHTS, Fla. (AP) — The Gladiolus Food Pantry usually hands out supplies on Wednesdays to about 240 families, so when Hurricane Ian swept through that day and canceled their distribution, it was left full of flats of canned black beans, bags of rice, meats, bread and produce — food that helps families struggling with rising rents and inflation make ends meet.

By the weekend, much of that food was in the garbage, the floors were still wet and muddy from the floodwaters that had filled the room, and the pantry’s founder and director, Miriam Ortiz, was worried about what would become of her neighborhood as she worked to get the pantry she started nine years ago up and running again.

“Right now I don’t know what we’re going to do because we’re going to need food, we’re going to need water, we’re going to need everything,” she said. “We got flooded and the water came through all the building.”

Ortiz said the food pantry’s green building is the heart of the Harlem Heights neighborhood, a small, mostly Hispanic community of nearly 2,000 people near Fort Myers that was hammered by the Category 4 hurricane. A sign scrawled on a piece of roofing that had torn loose advertised free food, diapers, wipes, body wash and toothpaste.

Gloria Galindo walks outside her apartment in Harlem Heights, Fla., Saturday, Oct. 1, 2022, as she helps her mother clean out the building damaged by flooding from Hurricane Ian.(Rebecca Santana)

The wind, rain and storm surge that accompany hurricanes affect everyone in their path. But those combined effects are often more of a disaster for poor people living day to day, like many in Harlem Heights, where the median income is a little under $26,000, according to U.S. Census data.

Many are hourly workers with little savings for things such as evacuation hotel stays or money to tide them over until their places of employment reopen. In a tourism heavy economy like South Florida’s, the wait for hotels to reopen and visitors — along with the jobs they bring — to return can be long and agonizing.

Ortiz said many of the clients she was seeing every week before the hurricane were already hurting from the skyrocketing cost of food and housing. Rising rents had forced many young adults that had been living on their own to move back in with parents and grandparents, she said.

Over the weekend, cars and trucks whizzed down the neighborhood’s main road, which was dry and had been swept free of tree limbs and palm fronds. That wasn’t the case on many side streets, many of which were still submerged in water as residents hauled waterlogged furniture to the curb.

At Maria Galindo’s apartment, the water had risen to about hip height and the wind had ripped off part of her roof while she and her 9-year-old daughter, Gloria, were terrified inside. Her daughter said that during the storm, she kept thinking she wanted to return to her native Guatemala.

“We did not know where to go, where to grab onto, whether here or there because of the rain, the wind, the water. … It was very difficult,” said Maria Galindo, speaking in Spanish.

They and their neighbors were trying to salvage what they could and to push the water from their waterlogged apartments. Wet clothes hung from a clothes line outside, while inside a thin seam of light coming between the wall and ceiling showed where the roof had been lifted.

Galindo works as a housekeeper at a local hotel, but it’s closed until further notice. She’s worried for her family and her daughter and wondering how she’ll make ends meet.

“We are without a roof overhead. We need food. We need money to buy things,” she said. “We need help.”

Back at the food pantry, people had been delivering donations of food, cleaning supplies and clothing throughout the day Saturday, and a volunteer had set up a tent and was cooking food for people.

One of those who dropped by to deliver supplies was a frustrated Lisa Bertaux, who came with her friend. She ticked off the items that people needed: toothbrushes, deodorant, cleaning supplies, paper towels, children’s clothes and wipes. And the list went on.

“There is so much need here. … There’s very little food coming in so far. There’s a great need,” she said. “It’s time for us to rebuild our community.”

One of those coming by to pick up supplies was Keyondra Smith, who lives down the street in an apartment complex with her three kids. She had parked her car in a different area so that when the floodwaters came sweeping through, she didn’t lose it. Her neighbors weren’t so lucky, as cars floated through the parking lot during the worst of the flooding and the people who lived on the first floor — she’s on the second — were completely flooded out.

Smith had been driving by the food pantry when she noticed it had supplies so she stopped to pick up some toilet paper, water and hot plates of food. Before that, her family had been eating raviolis out of a can, Vienna sausages and snacks from a local convenience store.

“We don’t have any water. My food is spoiling in the refrigerator,” she said. Though she can drive to the few stores that are open, she said they are only taking cash and many of the ATMs aren’t working. “I have three kids so I have to get some supplies to feed them.”

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Follow Santana on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ruskygal



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98.3 TRY Social Dilemma: Should I have to dye my hair if my husband doesn’t like it?

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ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — Today’s 98.3 TRY Social Dilemma came from Jessica and it’s about gray hair. Here’s her email:

Hi Jaime. Here’s my issue. During the Covid lockdowns, I obviously didn’t get my hair done for almost a year. So because of that, I decided to stop dying my hair and just let my gray grow out. It’s finally at the stage where it’s all gray and I actually really love it. But I’ve noticed that lately, my husband has been making snide comments about my look, like “when did I marry an old lady,” and stuff like that. I’ve tried to laugh it off but it’s really starting to get to me. What do you think I should do? Should I call my husband out on his teasing? Or should I just suck it up and start dying my hair again? What do you think you would do? Thanks so much for your help.

~ Jessica

Well, I’m a believer that your look should be about what makes you happy, not what makes others happy, even your spouse. I would say something to my spouse if that was happening to me. But that’s just my take.

What would you do? Let’s help Jessica out and let me know what you think on the TRY Facebook page.



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Artemis 1 left undamaged in Hurricane Ian, next launch is planned for November

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“Focusing efforts on the November launch period allows time for employees at Kennedy to address the needs of their families and homes after the storm,” NASA said.

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Artemis 1’s November launch is a go… at least for now. 

NASA said a team at the Kennedy Space Center conducted initial inspections on Friday to assess any damage from Hurricane Ian on the Artemis flight hardware. 

While there was no damage to the flight hardware, there was minor water intrusion identified in facilities. 

NASA said engineers will extend access on platforms around the Space Launch System rocket and Orion spacecraft inside the Vehicle Assembly Building to prepare for additional inspections in preparation for the next launch attempt. 

The most recent launch attempt was scrapped on Sept. 23 as NASA prepared for Ian. It would have been the third launch attempt for the Space Launch System rocket. Fuel leaks and other technical problems stopped the first two launch attempts in late August and early September. 

NASA said it will focus Artemis 1 launch planning efforts for a launch period that will open on Nov. 12 and Nov. 27.

“Focusing efforts on the November launch period allows time for employees at Kennedy to address the needs of their families and homes after the storm and for teams to identify additional checkouts needed before returning to the pad for launch,” NASA said in a press release. 

Hurricane Ian tore through southwest Florida on Wednesday leaving behind flooded neighborhoods and devastation.

The storm caused catastrophic storm surge, winds and flooding over the Florida peninsula as it made landfall, the National Hurricane Center reported.

The center of Ian moved over Central Florida through Thursday before emerging over the Atlantic and barreled toward South Carolina. 



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Supreme Court welcomes the public again, and a new justice

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The Supreme Court is beginning its new term, welcoming the public back to the courtroom and hearing arguments for the first time since issuing a landmark ruling stripping away women’s constitutional protections for abortion.Monday’s session also is the first time new Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson, the court’s first Black female justice, will participate in arguments. And the public is back for the first time since the court closed in March 2020 because of the coronavirus pandemic. The court’s overturning of the nearly 50-year-old Roe v. Wade abortion decision is still reverberating in legal fights over state abortion bans and other restrictions. But a new stack of high-profile cases awaits the justices. Several cases the court has agreed to hear involve race or elections or both, and the court has also agreed to hear a dispute that returns the issue of free speech and LGBTQ rights to the court.Also hanging over the justices is some unfinished business from last term: the leak of a draft of the abortion decision seven weeks before it was formally announced. Chief Justice John Roberts ordered an investigation, but the court has yet to provide an update. Jackson, for her part, has been waiting for months to fully begin her new role since being confirmed in April. She was sworn in when Justice Stephen Breyer retired in June, at the end of a term where the court dominated 6-3 by conservatives also expanded gun rights, reined in the government’s ability to fight climate change and blocked a Biden administration effort to get workers at large companies vaccinated against COVID-19. Breyer, a liberal, was on the losing side of those cases, and Jackson is also expected to be in dissent in many of the court’s most prominent cases.Since she was sworn in, however, the court has largely been on a summer break. The justices met privately last week to consider a long list of appeals that piled up over the summer. On Friday, the justices took the bench for a brief ceremony in which Roberts wished Jackson a “long and happy career in our common calling,” the traditional welcome for a new justice.But Jackson also joins the court at a time of declining public support for the court. Polls following the court’s abortion decision have shown a sharp drop in the court’s approval rating and in people’s confidence in the court as an institution. A poll over the summer found 43% of Americans saying they have hardly any confidence in the court, up from 27% earlier in the year.On Monday, the court is considering an important water rights case that could limit federal regulation under the nation’s main water pollution law, the Clean Water Act. Other significant cases include a controversial Republican-led appeal that could dramatically change the way elections for Congress and the presidency are conducted by handing more power to state legislatures. There’s also the case of a Colorado website designer who says her religious beliefs prevent her working with same-sex couples on their weddings. Next month, the justices will hear a challenge to the consideration of race in college admissions.___Follow AP’s coverage of the Supreme Court at https://apnews.com/hub/us-supreme-court

The Supreme Court is beginning its new term, welcoming the public back to the courtroom and hearing arguments for the first time since issuing a landmark ruling stripping away women’s constitutional protections for abortion.

Monday’s session also is the first time new Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson, the court’s first Black female justice, will participate in arguments. And the public is back for the first time since the court closed in March 2020 because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The court’s overturning of the nearly 50-year-old Roe v. Wade abortion decision is still reverberating in legal fights over state abortion bans and other restrictions. But a new stack of high-profile cases awaits the justices. Several cases the court has agreed to hear involve race or elections or both, and the court has also agreed to hear a dispute that returns the issue of free speech and LGBTQ rights to the court.

Also hanging over the justices is some unfinished business from last term: the leak of a draft of the abortion decision seven weeks before it was formally announced. Chief Justice John Roberts ordered an investigation, but the court has yet to provide an update.

Jackson, for her part, has been waiting for months to fully begin her new role since being confirmed in April. She was sworn in when Justice Stephen Breyer retired in June, at the end of a term where the court dominated 6-3 by conservatives also expanded gun rights, reined in the government’s ability to fight climate change and blocked a Biden administration effort to get workers at large companies vaccinated against COVID-19. Breyer, a liberal, was on the losing side of those cases, and Jackson is also expected to be in dissent in many of the court’s most prominent cases.

Since she was sworn in, however, the court has largely been on a summer break. The justices met privately last week to consider a long list of appeals that piled up over the summer. On Friday, the justices took the bench for a brief ceremony in which Roberts wished Jackson a “long and happy career in our common calling,” the traditional welcome for a new justice.

But Jackson also joins the court at a time of declining public support for the court. Polls following the court’s abortion decision have shown a sharp drop in the court’s approval rating and in people’s confidence in the court as an institution. A poll over the summer found 43% of Americans saying they have hardly any confidence in the court, up from 27% earlier in the year.

On Monday, the court is considering an important water rights case that could limit federal regulation under the nation’s main water pollution law, the Clean Water Act.

Other significant cases include a controversial Republican-led appeal that could dramatically change the way elections for Congress and the presidency are conducted by handing more power to state legislatures. There’s also the case of a Colorado website designer who says her religious beliefs prevent her working with same-sex couples on their weddings. Next month, the justices will hear a challenge to the consideration of race in college admissions.

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Follow AP’s coverage of the Supreme Court at https://apnews.com/hub/us-supreme-court



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